College Receives $5,000 EITC Contribution from Pride Mobility

Recently, Johnson College received a $5,000 EITC contribution from Pride Mobility in support of the College’s STEM Outreach and Industry Fast Track Programs.

Pride Mobility’s contribution to Johnson College is part of Pennsylvania’s Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) Program, administered by the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development. The program offers businesses a tax credit for supporting state-approved educational improvement programs. Johnson College is approved to accept EITC contributions in support of its STEM outreach and Industry Fast Track programs.

Through its STEM Outreach, Johnson College utilizes its experience in providing industry-focused, hands-on technical education to expand its outreach to elementary, middle, and high school students. The outreach raises awareness of the benefits of STEM education and the possibilities of achieving economic independence through employment in a STEM career field.

Johnson College’s Industry Fast Track program offers high school students from participating area school districts an opportunity to enroll simultaneously in secondary and post-secondary coursework at Johnson College. The course meets state requirements for high school graduation while providing college-level courses. Students remain enrolled full-time at their high school while attending classes at Johnson College.

Pride Mobility has been a trusted manufacturer in the mobility products industry since 1986. The organization is dedicated to providing expertly designed, engineered, and tested products incorporating technologically innovative features enabling consumers to achieve the best quality of life and mobility goals. Part of Pride’s vision is to be a long-term Olympic gold medalist within its industry by combining market-leading products with being the friendliest company in the industry. Pride Mobility continues its mission of manufacturing quality, technologically advanced mobility products for people with disabilities and mobility impairments.

Continuing Education Team Enrolling Students in Two Different Welding Classes

Johnson College’s Continuing Education Program is currently enrolling students in a Fundamentals of Welding and Intermediate MIG Welding class starting June 21, 2022, and Fundamentals of Welding and Intermediate Stick Welding beginning June 30, 2022. Both classes will be held on the Johnson College campus in Scranton. To learn more or enroll, visit https://johnson.edu/continuingeducation/ or contact the Johnson College Continuing Education department at 570-702-8979 or email continuinged@johnson.edu

Both classes will teach the basics of the major welding processes and then focus on either Gas Metal Arc Welding (MIG) or Shielded Metal Arc Welding (Stick).

The Fundamentals of Welding and Intermediate MIG Welding class provides specific instruction in the Gas Metal Arc (GMAW) and Flux-Cored Arc (FCAW) welding processes. Students will learn how to perform fillet and groove welds in all positions. Student practice is geared toward sheet metal and structural steel welding code vertical and overhead tests. Passing the certification test provides an all-position, limited thickness, AWS D1.1 welder certification in FCAW, and vertical D1.3 structural sheet metal code certification in GMAW.

The Fundamentals of Welding and Intermediate Stick Welding class will provide specific instruction in the Shielded Metal Arc (SMAW) welding process. Students learn how to perform fillet and groove welds on carbon steel using E6010 and E7018 electrodes in all positions. Student practice is geared toward structural welding code vertical and overhead tests. Passing these tests provides an all position, limited thickness, and AWS D1.1 welder certification.

Enrolling Students in OBDII Emissions Training Course

Johnson College’s Continuing Education department is enrolling students into its next OBDII Emissions Training. The class will be held on the Johnson College campus in Scranton on Monday, June 27, Tuesday, June 28, and Thursday, June 30, 2022, from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. The class fee to be paid to Johnson College is $180, and a study material and testing fee of $39.99 is paid directly to the PA Training Portal. For more details, visit Johnson.edu/continuingeducation, call 570-702-8979, or email continuinged@johnson.edu.

The OBDII testing monitors a vehicle’s emission control systems in real-time and can inform a licensed technician of a systemic issue the moment it occurs. The system operates through a series of indicator lights, drive cycles, trouble codes, and readiness monitors. During an inspection, an emission analyzer scan tool plugs into the diagnostic connector attached to the OBDII computer and communicates with the vehicle. The OBDII system relays whether it has discovered errors in the emission control systems to the scan tool. The emission analyzer then determines if the car is being operated according to emission standards.

Johnson College Announces $5 Million Comprehensive Capital Campaign for Campus Enhancements

Johnson College publicly launched its new, $5 million comprehensive, five-year capital campaign, “Innovation at Work,” during a community kickoff event on Wednesday, June 8, where it revealed plans for major campus-wide projects.

The “Innovation at Work” campaign consists of four components that will create an environment for growth and success: the construction of a new gateway building, which will become the official entrance to the campus and include new lab and classroom space; the expansion of Woolworth Hall which houses on-campus lab space for programs including Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning and Electrical Construction Technology; the creation of a Transportation Education Center; and support of the College’s Annual Fund and student scholarships.

A crucial catalyst for the “Innovation at Work” campaign is a $1 million contribution from Ideal T. Saldi, a Johnson College alum from the class of 1949, and his wife, Frances Saldi, alongside other funders who have invested in the College. The Saldis’ gift, announced in April before the college community, is the largest gift from a Johnson College alum to date and will have a lasting impact on the school, and its students. To honor this gift, the new, state-of-the-art gateway building will be named Ideal Saldi Hall.

“At the heart of this campaign is our students. It is focused on helping them be successful,” President and CEO, Dr. Katie Leonard said. “We strive to carry forward Orlando S. Johnson’s vision of providing a trade school to the region where young men and women can learn useful trades that will enable them to make an honorable living and become contributing members of society.”

As the world of technology continues to change rapidly, Johnson College must change with it. The College’s facilities must remain in sync with industry as new technologies, emerging fields of study, and more sophisticated equipment modernize how the world does business. 

Dave Boniello, president of Simplex Homes, Johnson College Alum from the class of 1984, former Johnson College Chair of the Board of Directors, and chair of the “Innovation at Work” Capital Campaign, announced that during the campaign’s silent phase, the College has already raised 75% of its $5 million-dollar goal thanks to loyal and generous donors from the community. After noting his personal pledge to support the campaign, Boniello asked the Johnson College community to join him in participating in the school’s most comprehensive capital campaign thus far.

“If you have an opportunity to support Johnson College and its students, through the “Innovation at Work” campaign, your gift will have a tremendous and lasting impact on our students, employers, and the region. Together, We Work!” said Boniello.  

For more information about Johnson College’s comprehensive, 5-year capital campaign, “Innovation at Work,” visit Johnson.edu/innovationatwork.

Photo Caption: Johnson College publicly launched its new, $5 million comprehensive, five-year capital campaign, “Innovation at Work,” during a community kickoff event on Wednesday, June 8, revealing plans for major campus-wide projects. One of the four projects announced is the construction of Ideal Saldi Hall. Dr. Katie Leonard, President & CEO of Johnson College, and Mr. Dave Boniello ’84, President of Simplex Homes and chair of the “Innovation at Work” Capital Campaign, stand in front of a rendering of Ideal Saldi Hall. For more information about Johnson College’s comprehensive, 5-year capital campaign, “Innovation at Work,” visit Johnson.edu/innovationatwork. 

Nose to Tail: Keeping Pets Cool

By Kimberly Konopka, BS, AS, CVT, ESMT

Originally published in the May 27, 2022, edition of the Valley Advantage.

https://www.thevalleyadvantage.com/community-columns/nose-to-tail-keeping-pets-cool/article_9f714d07-3342-54e6-9496-da313a158250.html

It’s a beautiful summer day and you are thinking: Do I go for a car ride, take a walk, or even stroll on the beach? As a responsible pet owner, there are some things to consider before you choose.

Leaving your pet in a hot car may lead to deadly heat stroke, and, in several states, it may be illegal. A quick stop with the windows cracked open can become deadly quicker than one may think.

According to aldf.org, as of 2019, 31 states and the District of Columbia have some form of law against leaving animals unattended in a hot car. These laws vary from state to state, involving legal action against the car owner, while other states have laws to protect a person who may use forcible means to rescue a vulnerable animal. It’s recommended that you review your state laws on this topic.

How hot is too hot for my pet? Temperatures in vehicles can rise very quickly. A lovely 70 degrees outside the car changes to 89 degrees within 10 minutes inside the car, and within 30 minutes, may reach 104 degrees. As the temperature increases by 5-degree increments, the vehicle’s inside rises exponentially.

What does heatstroke look like in a pet? The clinical signs of a pet overheating include excessive panting, increased heart, and respiratory rates, difficulty breathing, mild weakness to stupor, and collapse. If your pet’s internal body temperature approaches 104 degrees, the clinical signs might include seizures, bloody diarrhea, and vomiting.

Dogs and cats both have sweat glands in their feet but utilize a second method for cooling down as they do not sweat like humans. Dogs pant to cool themselves down, while cats lick their hair coat. However, brachycephalic breeds — those with a flat snout like boxers, pugs and Persian cats, for example — are more susceptible to heatstroke because they can’t pant as effectively as other breeds.

When it comes to taking a walk down the road, or on the beach, not only is heatstroke a concern but there is another danger to watch out for: burned paw pads. Asphalt, pavement, artificial grass, sand and even dirt can become so hot that it may cause blistering and burning of an animal’s paw pads. Puppies and kittens are at a higher risk of damage because their paw pads are still very sensitive.

When outside temperatures reach 85+ degrees and remain constant throughout the day, even a short stroll may cause serious injury. According to the American Medical Association, if the air temperature is 86 degrees, the asphalt temperature is 135 degrees. The general rule of thumb for determining if the surface is too hot for your pet is to either place your palm or barefoot on the surface for 5 seconds. If it’s too hot for you to handle, it’s too hot for your pet.

How do you recognize injury to the paw pads? If your pet limps, is reluctant to walk or stand, licks or chews their feet, or if the pads are darker in color than usual, you will want to examine further. There may be visible signs of a burn, such as blisters. Bring the pet to a cool location and flush the feet with cold water or cold compress. Try to keep them from licking and seek veterinary care as burns will need to be addressed to help prevent further damage or infection.

There are a few things you may try to help reduce the chance of paw pad burns and injury:

Paw wax: This is a wax created explicitly for pets and designed to help protect the pads from hot surfaces in the warmer months and potentially harmful chemicals such as rock salt and anti-skid when it’s colder.

Dog shoes/boots: If your dog will wear them, this is one of the best ways an owner can protect their pet’s feet from injury. These may come in a variety of styles and materials, but you will want to make sure that the bottom of the boot has a rubber sole. Please understand that not all pets will tolerate wearing them or be comfortable walking in them. Be sure to work with your pet well in advance of the day you want them to wear them for protection.

During the hot months, it’s a good practice to check your pet’s paw pads regularly. This will train your eye to what is “normal” for your pet and allow you to apply a pet-safe moisturizer to keep pads soft and healthy and help to prevent injuries.

This information should help you keep your pets safe this summer season.

Kimberly Konopka, BS, AS, CVT, ESMT, is the program director of the Veterinary Nursing Program at Johnson College. She has been in the field of veterinary medicine for 15 years.

Johnson College Receives Grant from Women in Philanthropy

Johnson College has been awarded a $5,000 grant from the Women in Philanthropy Initiative Fund of the Scranton Area Community Foundation. This grant will support Girls on Fire, a unique one-day STEM event designed for 6-9th grade students to learn about career opportunities in non-traditional STEM fields.

The event, part of Johnson College’s new Women in Industry Initiative, will be conducted in conjunction with International Women’s Day in March 2023. The event will include tours of the Johnson College campus, presentations on various STEM-related programs, a keynote speaker who is a successful woman in her field, lunch, and fun hands-on activities in 3D printing, carpentry, and more. Students will learn about mechatronics, computer science, HVAC-R, healthcare, and carpentry – all areas where women have a variety of opportunities for successful careers.

Studies show that when the women’s labor force participation rises, so do the economy and the GDP. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics notes in “Women in the Labor Force: A Databook” that women may represent more than half of all workers within several industries. Despite this, women are substantially underrepresented in industries such as construction, manufacturing, utilities, and other industrial types of employment such as agriculture and mining. They are also underrepresented in services such as repair and maintenance, automotive repair, and commercial and industrial machinery repair. Women’s participation in the U.S. labor force has been a complicated narrative, especially in skilled trades.

There are many opportunities, pathways, and resources available to women looking to enter skilled trades. Girls on Fire will help students understand the many pathways for women’s economic equity and increase participation in well-paid, skilled jobs traditionally held by men.

Women in Philanthropy is an initiative of the Scranton Area Community Foundation dedicated to transforming the lives of women, girls, and their families in Northeastern Pennsylvania. For more information, visit www.supportnepawomen.org.

Now Enrolling Students from Rural Areas into Fall 2022 Distance Learning Program

Johnson College is now enrolling for its Fall 2022 Distance Learning Program for high school and adult students in the rural areas of Wayne, Pike, and Susquehanna counties. It creates a direct route for students to complete any of Johnson College’s seventeen 2-year associate’s degree programs and ultimately a fulfilling career with family-sustaining wages while staying in their communities. To learn more about this program or to register for courses listed below, please visit Johnson.edu/usda-registration or email the Johnson College enrollment team at enroll@johnson.edu.

Students will have interactive, two-way access to Johnson College faculty and participate in remote education, discussions, testing, and skill demonstrations via high-tech telecommunications equipment in classrooms at Forest City Regional High School, Honesdale High School, Wallenpaupack Area High School, and Western Wayne High School. Furthermore, Lakeville Library, Newfoundland Library, and Pleasant Mount Library will be equipped with laptops to give community residents access to career exploration services and information about courses at Johnson College. 

In addition to the distance learning opportunity this program provides, students will have access to Johnson College’s full array of on-campus support services including tutoring, counseling, career services, financial aid, internship opportunities, and exposure to industry from day one. Distance learning will help high school and adult students reach their full potential and connect with the region’s essential careers already in demand.

Distance learning courses available at all participating high schools will include:

BUS 105-1 E-Commerce – Mondays, 4 p.m. to 6:50 p.m.          

CDT 123-1 Surveying & Mapping – Wednesdays, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

ART 110-1 Contract Drawings – Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:30 p.m. to 1:45 p.m.

ART 105-2 Blueprint & Schematic Reading – Fridays, 1:00 p.m. to 3:50 p.m.

ART 110-4 Contract Drawings – Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:00 p.m. to 6:15 p.m.

PRG 101-2 Programming for Enterprise – Wednesdays, 3:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.               

Additionally, a special job training course in intermediate shielded metal arc welding will be available through Honesdale High School. This 8-week, 90-hour course will provide the necessary knowledge and skills for an entry-level welder. Through theory and hands-on practice, students will learn oxy-fuel, gas tungsten arc (TIG), gas metal arc (MIG), and shielded metal arc (Stick) processes. Lectures will include basic metallurgy, welding codes, non-destructive examination, and welding symbols. Emphasis will be placed students’ ability to prepare material and perform welding of fillet and grieve welds in carbon steel using E7018 electrodes in all positions. Students will have the opportunity to take the qualification test. This program is funded in part by a grant from the United States Department of Agriculture’s Distance Learning and Telemedicine Grant Program.

Spring 2022 Semester President’s List

Dr. Katie Leonard, President & CEO of Johnson College, has announced the President’s List of students who have completed the 2022 Spring Semester with a grade point average of 3.90 or higher.

Jacob Banta, Automotive Technology, Trucksville, PA

Brittany Bethel, Veterinary Nursing, Dallas, PA

Richard Christianson, Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning Technology, Susquehanna, PA

Philip Davitt, Electrical and Construction Technology, Dickson City, PA

Dylan DeGroat, Automotive Technology, Shohola, PA

Jon Dellia, Physical Therapist Assistant, Olyphant, PA

Brandon Grandinetti, Computer Information Technology, Olyphant, PA

Jacob Hansen, Electrical and Construction Technology, Clarks Summit, PA

Joseph Healey, Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning Technology, Throop, PA

Jared Hodorawis, Architectural Drafting & Design Technology, Honesdale, PA

Chandler Holmes, Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning Technology, Shickshinny, PA

Colby Kogan, Automotive Technology, Tobyhanna, PA

Anthony Kutchmanich, Physical Therapist Assistant, Greenfield Twp., PA

Andrea Marques, Carpentry and Cabinetmaking Technology, Sybertsville, PA

Alexander Mros, Radiologic Technology, Wilkes-Barre, PA

Virginia Murray, Automotive Technology, Jessup, PA

Alexander Nallin, Veterinary Nursing, Scranton, PA

David Neiman, Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning Technology, Shavertown, PA

Devin Nowicky, Radiologic Technology, Drums, PA

Nichole Nye, Electrical and Construction Technology, Archbald, PA

Brianna Onyshczak, Physical Therapist Assistant, Blakely, PA

Christian Overholtz, Automotive Technology, Scranton, PA

Tanya Patterson, Radiologic Technology, Monroe Township, PA

Matthew Rosengrant, Electrical and Construction Technology, Lake Ariel, PA

Michael Salansky, Computer Information Technology, Susquehanna, PA

Terry Benjamin, Biomedical Equipment Technology, Richmondale, PA

Arthur Vitagliano, Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning Technology, Prompton, PA

Nancy Wassef, Radiologic Technology, Tobyhanna, PA

John Wesnesky, Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Clarks Summit, PA

Evan Wilcox, Architectural Drafting & Design Technology, Milanville, PA

Emily Williams, Computer Information Technology, Scott Township, PA

Nose to Tail: Protecting pets from fleas and ticks

By Meg Varner-Soden, DVM

Originally published in the April 29, 2022, edition of the Valley Advantage.

https://www.thevalleyadvantage.com/community-columns/nose-to-tail-protecting-pets-from-fleas-and-ticks/article_c519ee45-68d5-5c60-80ac-c81bc9c81d60.html

As the days become warmer and rain replaces snow, my mind switches gears away from skis and shovels to gardening and hiking.

There’s nothing I love more than to be outside all day with my family and our dog. However, especially now that I am both a pet and human parent, I dread the unavoidable surge in encounters with parasites — especially fleas and ticks. Today, I will try to answer a few of the more common questions many pet owners have about these external parasites.

Our first question is, “Why are veterinary teams so concerned with year-round prevention of fleas and ticks on my pets?”

Actually, human health care providers are as concerned as your veterinary team because, while flea and tick infestations are an unsightly nuisance, they also present a real risk of vector-borne diseases, which are diseases spread by biting insects, for both our pets and ourselves.

Ticks become active as soon as that thermometer reaches 35 degrees Fahrenheit. Folks, we have had warm spells as early as February for the last few years, so it’s never too early to keep alert for ticks.

There are several common species of ticks in our region, ever-increasing in prevalence due to wildlife movement and a warmer climate. They may carry Lyme disease (Borreliosis), Anaplasma, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Ehrlichia and Babesia. These diseases may be tricky to diagnose quickly and have the potential to become a chronic problem, which is both an emotional and financial burden to carry.

Did you know that sometimes a single tick may carry and transmit more than one of those diseases at a time and one type of tick, called the Brown Dog Tick, prefers to live and hide indoors?

Fleas can cause anemia, flea bite dermatitis (a robust allergic skin reaction to the flea saliva), and are vectors for tapeworms, Cat Scratch disease, Hemoplasmas and even plague. Flea numbers can explosively escalate in a short time. A flea infestation, once noticed, is incredibly frustrating to eradicate because it takes significant time and diligence to clear all of its life stages. In health care providers’ opinions, proactively preventing an infestation is much more prudent than reacting to them after the fact.

“How can I prevent fleas and ticks from infesting my pets and home?” is our second question this month.

Many products are available — for both cats and dogs — that can simultaneously combat fleas and ticks for lengthy periods of time. There are both prescription and over-the-counter options, and they come in a variety of formulations ranging from collars to oral tablets to topical formulations. Consult with your veterinarian about which products are the best choices for your pets, lifestyle and budget.

Also, nothing beats a good flea combing routine, running your hands over your pets daily and routine bathing. My children anticipate that they are going to bathe every evening and we are going to check everyone, including the dog, for ticks.

When it comes to protecting the inside of your home, minimize the clutter that parasites can hide in, mitigate the presence of mice and vacuum and launder regularly — including the pets’ bedding. Promptly change out of your yardwork/hiking/hunting clothes and put them in an isolated area (or even run them through the laundry), and jump through the shower before you start relaxing inside. Be mindful of the humidity and heat in the house — fleas thrive in higher humidity and temperatures. Fleas are also more likely to thrive in homes full of carpet and fabric-upholstered furniture, anything that mimics a furry creature.

Outdoors, you can decrease the density of fleas and ticks by closely manicuring your grass, choosing plants that don’t attract deer, avoiding the lingering presence of leaf litter and brush piles and limiting ground cover and woodpiles close to the home.

Also, be mindful of the number of furry animals you own — the more pets, the more feeding stations available to fleas and ticks.

Ultimately, like with anything, knowledge is power. One excellent educational resource I recommend for all pet owners is CAPCvet.org, the Companion Animal Parasite Council website. And if you find your pets becoming prey to fleas and ticks, consult with your trusted veterinary team.

Dr. Meg Varner-Soden, DVM, is the veterinarian at the Johnson College Animal Care Center and an instructor for Johnson College’s two-year veterinary nursing associate degree program. She has been practicing veterinary medicine for 12 years.