New Two-Year Associates Degree Program, Civil Design Technology

Students can enroll in Johnson College’s new two-year Civil Design Technology associates degree program launching during the spring 2022 semester.

This two-year associate degree program prepares students as entry-level technicians in the field of civil engineering. This program provides the foundation for applying basic engineering principles and technical skills to support civil engineers engaged in designing and executing public works projects such as highways, dams, bridges, tunnels, and other facilities. The program also emphasizes professional interpersonal skills.

Students will acquire the skills necessary to obtain an entry-level position in the civil design field, which has a 3% growth potential through 2029 per the Bureau of Labor Statistics.  They will also demonstrate professional behavior and ethics to meet work challenges and develop critical thinking and decision-making skills.

Graduates will work as civil designers, CAD technicians, survey technicians, design engineering technicians, or similar roles in the civil engineering industry and have the opportunity to make a medium annual income of up to $53,410. Typical employers in the civil design career field are civil design and engineering firms, structural engineering companies, environmental engineering firms, surveyors, consulting firms, construction companies, and government design agencies.

“The launch of the Civil Design Technology program is a great example of how Johnson College continues to answer industry demand for highly skilled technicians,” said Dr. Katie Leonard, Johnson College President & CEO. “The College will work with industry partners to ensure our Civil Design Technology students are introduced to industry from day one and get the hands-on education needed for this in-demand career.”

To learn more about Johnson College’s new Civil Design Technology Program visit Johnson.edu/civildesign.

Photo Caption: Recently, Dr. Katie Leonard, President & CEO of Johnson College, visited PennDot’s I-84 Twin Bridge Project just outside of Dunmore, PA, to record a special Presidential Update Video announcing the launch of Johnson College’s new Civil Design Technology program, the College’s 16th two-year associates degree program. To watch the video, visit johnson.edu/presidential-update or learn more about the Civil Design Technology program at Johnson.edu/civildesign. Left to right: Chad Faraday, Civil Engineer Trainee, PennDot, Dr. Katie Leonard, President & CEO, Johnson College, Chris Christopher E. Rood ‘06, P.E., Assistant Construction Engineer, PennDot, and John Pivovarnik, P.E., Assistant Construction Engineer, PennDot. 

Now Accepting Students for CNC Machining Training Course in Luzerne County Starting on November 1

In conjunction with Don’s Machine Shop in West Pittston, Johnson College is now accepting students for its next CNC Machining training in Luzerne County. The course begins Monday, November 1, 2021. During this course, students will train to program and utilize Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machines. All class and lab work is completed inside Don’s Machine Shop’s classroom and lab at 100 Elm Street, West Pittston.

The relationship with Don’s Machine Shop truly demonstrates Johnson College’s dedication to making industry our students’ campus. This 510-hour class for beginner-level students includes theory as well as practical learning methods. Students will receive hands-on training on some of the most state-of-the-art equipment in the region. This unique training experience will open up new career opportunities right away.

Industries throughout northeastern Pennsylvania are currently in need of well-trained CNC machinists.

CNC machinists manufacture precision products and components used in various applications such as automotive, medical, electronics, aerospace, transportation, and military-related industries. Per the Bureau of Labor Statics, metal and plastic machine workers, including CNC Machinists, have the opportunity to earn a median annual income of up to $38,270.

Cost for the CNC training class is $7,500 and funding sources may be available for those who qualify. Space is limited. To learn more or to enroll, visit https://johnson.edu/continuing-education/510-computer-numerical-control-cnc-at-dons-machine-shop/ or contact the Johnson College Continuing Education Department at 570-702-8979 or continuinged@johnson.edu

Since starting over 30 years ago, Don’s Machine Shop, Inc. has become one of the largest machine shops in Pennsylvania’s Wyoming Valley. Their 77,000 square foot climate-controlled facility contains millions of dollars’ worth of modern equipment that is continually upgraded. Don’s Machine Shop, Inc. employs 30 people and makes machine parts for companies around the globe. Many things have changed over the past three decades, but Don’s Machine Shop’s commitment to providing quality parts and service will never change. For more information, visit http://www.donsmachine.com/

From Headlights to Taillights: Towing the Line

By Mark Kozemko, Johnson College’s Automotive Technology Program Director

Original published in the August 27, 2021 edition of the Valley Advantage.

https://www.thevalleyadvantage.com/community-columns/from-headlights-to-taillights-towing-the-line/article_05518445-349e-5a52-af84-19709c71143e.html

Summertime is not only about vacation time. It’s also about summer fun. By that, I mean camping, boating, jet skiing, and the like, all of which include towing something with your vehicle.

Over the last few weeks, a few readers submitted questions about towing, so I thought we’d answer a few this month.

Our first question is, “I want to buy a boat, but I’m not sure if my vehicle will tow it. Will I have to purchase a truck or other vehicle to get my new boat to the lake?”

It’s a great question. Most people I know who tow something have a truck to pull whatever they’re hauling.

A truck or large vehicle is not always necessary, and here’s why. The first thing you need to know is the camper weight or the weight of the boat with a trailer, jet ski(s) with a trailer, or whatever you’re towing. Usually, the information is on the vessel you’re planning to pull. The camper will have only one weight to consider, but the other towable items will have their weight plus the trailer weight. The total weight of the item and its trailer, if necessary, is called the Gross Combined Weight Rating, or GCWR.

The next thing you need to know is your vehicle’s towing capacity. Your car or truck manufacturer determines the towing capacity and lists this information in the vehicle’s owner’s manual. Of course, you can always Google your year, make and model to find this information, too.

Here are a few examples of towing capacity from https://auto.howstuffworks.com/. A 2009 Toyota Camry can tow a maximum of 1,000 pounds while a 2009 Toyota 4Runner can tow a maximum of 5,000 pounds. A 2009 Dodge Ram 1500 can tow a maximum of 3,800 pounds, and a 2009 Dodge Ram 3500 can tow up to 12,300 pounds.

As you can see from the examples, your current vehicle may be enough to get you — and your summer fun vessel — to your destination with no problems. Just remember, never exceed your vehicle’s maximum towing capacity. Doing so can cause significant damage to your vehicle’s engine or transmission.

“What is tongue weight?” is our second question.

Tongue weight is the weight put on the hitch at the connection of the trailer to the vehicle. A vehicle suspension is designed to carry a certain amount of weight. The weight is mainly made up of the vehicle itself, but the suspension can take additional weight when towing. The car or truck, and a specific hitch class, can carry a certain amount of weight.

If you connect your boat or whatever is on the trailer to your vehicle and the rear of the vehicle sags where the rear bumper is close to the ground, then your tongue weight is probably too much.

Our third question is, “If the tongue weight is too high, does this mean the vehicle is not capable of towing what I have connected?”

If connecting to the vehicle causes too much sag, it most likely means your vehicle cannot tow this particular unit. But, there is a chance the boat or whatever is on the trailer is not positioned on the trailer correctly. Let me explain.

If a boat and trailer have a combined weight of 950 pounds and you’re using a 2009 Toyota Camry that can safely tow 1,000 pounds to tow it, we know the weight is under the maximum towing capacity.

However, if the tongue weight is too high, the excess weight causes the rear of the vehicle to sag excessively. This extra weight can create an unsafe driving condition. When we investigate a bit further, we find the boat is too far forward on the trailer, and this adds to the tongue weight. The boat’s position on the trailer needs to be adjusted to get the boat weight back over the wheels of the trailer. When we do this, the tongue weight and the sagging condition are corrected.

“Do I need a special tow hitch on my vehicle?” is our fourth and final question.

Tow hitches are designated by class. The class of the hitch is determined by the tongue weight capacity and the towing capacity. The hitch class goes from a Class I hitch with a tongue weight capacity of 100–150 pounds and a towing capacity of 1,000–1,500 pounds to a Class IV hitch with a tongue weight capacity of 500 pounds or more and a towing capacity of 10,000 pounds. Your vehicle’s towing capacity will determine what class hitch you should have installed to meet all the safety requirements.

Remember that safety is always first, so be safe, no matter what your choice of summer fun may be.

Johnson College Renames Veterinary Technology Associate Program to Veterinary Nursing

Johnson College has renamed its two-year Veterinary Technology Associate in Science Degree Program to Veterinary Nursing. Johnson College joins a movement within the Veterinary Science industry, being the 11th college and university to rename its Veterinary Technology program.

This name change more accurately describes the nature of the program and better aligns it with the skills needed in the Veterinary Science field.

Veterinary Nursing will continue to be a two-year associate degree program preparing students to take the Veterinary Technician National Exam. In addition, students earn the credentials required to become entry-level Veterinary technicians. Last year, 100% of this program’s graduates who took the VTNE passed. Currently, the College has a three-year Veterinary Technician National Exam average pass rate of 94%.

“We are incredibly excited about this change and look forward to watching our graduates succeed in the Veterinary Technology industry,” said Bill Burke, M.S., Johnson College’s Vice President of Student and Academic Affairs. “Per the Bureau of Labor Statistics, this industry has a 16% Growth potential through 2029.”

As technicians, graduates collect samples, perform lab tests, take radiographs, prepare the surgical suite, assist in surgery, monitor anesthesia, and provide general nursing care to patients. Second-year students in the program will still be required to complete clinical rotations in the on-campus Animal Care Center.

For more information about Johnson College’s Veterinary Nursing program visit Johnson.edu or contact the Johnson College Enrollment team at 570-702-8556 or enroll@johnson.edu.

Johnson College provides real-world, hands-on learning in a caring environment and prepares graduates to enter into or advance their careers. Johnson College degrees become essential careers. Johnson College was founded in 1912 and is the region’s premier technical college, offering 15 associate degree and 3 academic certificate programs. A low student-to-teacher ratio supports an emphasis on hands-on instruction. Located in Scranton on a 44-acre campus, the College is an accredited, private, non-profit, co-educational institution with a strong tradition of working with regional businesses and industries to ensure a skilled and qualified workforce. For additional information on Johnson College, please call 1-800-2-WE-WORK, email enroll@johnson.edu, or visit Johnson.edu.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update

The Johnson College COVID-19 Dashboard provides weekly updates on confirmed cases within our campus community.

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Posted on August 9,2021 at 2:07 pm

Johnson College is re-establishing its on-campus face-covering policy due to the contagious delta COVID-19 variant and Lackawanna County’s substantial COVID-19 spread.  Effective immediately, all faculty, staff, students, and visitors, regardless of vaccinated status, must be masked at all times while inside on-campus buildings, classrooms, and labs.

The health and safety of our campus community continues to be our top priority as we deliver our mission of student-centered, real-world, hands-on learning in a caring and safe environment.

This plan is subject to change pending guidelines set forth by local, state, and national government officials and appropriate health agencies.

__________________________________________________________

Posted on July 14, 2021 at 8:43 am

At this time, Johnson College does not require its students, employees, or visitors to be fully vaccinated. The College strongly advises individuals who are not fully vaccinated to wear face coverings and continue to social distance when on campus. ​The health and safety of our students, employees, and visitors on campus continue to be our top priority, and we are closely and consistently following recommendations from the CDC and the state.

__________________________________________________________

Posted on March 29, 2021 at 2:00 pm

Fall 2021 Reopening Plan

Dear Students,

We will welcome more students back to campus for in-person classes and labs for the 2021-22 academic year starting with its summer session on June 28, 2021. Through our enhanced course offerings, we are committed to delivering our mission of providing students with real-world, hands-on learning in a caring and safe environment. Students will be able to choose either in-person or virtual classes for their general education and program theory courses, which have only been offered virtually since March 2020. Labs and lab-related coursework will continue to be delivered in-person, on our campus, or at one of our industry partner lab locations. CDC guidelines will be adhered to at all locations.

Throughout the 2021-2022 academic year, our plan includes the following:

• Campus will be zoned to ensure contact tracing. Masks will be provided, and social distancing guidelines enforced.
• Our Facilities Department is following all CDC cleaning guidelines for campus.
• The student Café will not operate as normal. Students, staff and faculty will be allowed to bring their own food and use the dining area. Tables and chairs will be set up within social distancing guidelines. We are planning to have “grab and go” items available too.
• Congregating and events will be limited.
• Housing will not be available for the foreseeable future. If you need housing, you should reach out to our office of Student Engagement for other options.

This plan is subject to change pending guidelines set forth by local, state, and national government officials and appropriate health agencies.

As we move forward from this past academic year, we’re thrilled to be able to welcome you, some for the first time, on campus, with even more flexible options for your education.

Sincerely,

Dr. Katie Leonard
President & CEO

__________________________________________________________

Posted on June 16, 2020 at 12:12 pm

Fall 2020 Reopening Plan

Dear Students,

I am pleased to announce that Johnson College has developed a fall 2020 reopening plan which will go into effect on August 31, 2020, the first day of class. Johnson College will be welcoming students back this fall for in-person classes while operating in a hybrid model. This schedule will be in place for at least one full academic year. In this model, we will continue to deliver on our mission of providing students with “real world, hands-on learning in a caring environment.”

In this new hybrid model, we will be able to increase flexibility for our students, while prioritizing their safety and giving them the hands-on learning that they need to thrive in industry. General Education classes and program theory classes will be delivered online. Labs and lab-related coursework will be delivered in-person, in a safe manner, following social distancing guidelines, both on campus and at industry lab locations. In some cases, we may be utilizing simulation software and at home lab kits.

To ensure that our reopening plan meets the needs of our students and adheres to the guideline set forth by government and health officials, I have met regularly with local health officials, the Mayor, state officials, and other college presidents. Health officials have been sharing that the key to reopening is proper PPE, like masks, and social distancing. They also support the idea that we must be prepared to operate in new ways. The reopening plan that we have developed includes a reopening task force, who will be meeting to assist in executing and monitoring the plan.

In addition to the hybrid model of learning, the College’s plan includes the following:
• Campus will be zoned to ensure contact tracing. Masks will be provided, and social distancing guidelines enforced.
• The Facilities Department is following all CDC cleaning guidelines for campus.
• The student Café will not operate as normal. Students will be allowed to bring their own food and use the dining area. Tables and chairs will be set up within social distancing guidelines. We are planning to have “grab and go” items available to students as well.
• Congregating and events will be limited.
• Housing will not be available for the foreseeable future. Students who need housing should reach out to the office of Student Engagement for other options.

Due to the ongoing concerns regarding COVID-19, this plan is subject to change pending guidelines set forth by local, state, and national government officials and appropriate health agencies. I know this is different from how we are used to operating but this model ensures that students still get the hands-on experience and exposure to industry partners for which Johnson College is known. Thank you for your patience and understanding as we navigate this together. I would also like to thank our industry partners for giving us the opportunity to continue to use their spaces for lab and clinical instruction. We would not be able to deliver our high-quality, hands-on education without them.

Thank you, students, for your continued hard-work and adaptability. Faculty and staff are available to help you and are committed to helping you achieve your academic and career goals. We will slowly be reopening campus over the summer as Pennsylvania transitions through its reopening plan. Students will be finishing their requirements from the spring semester and faculty and staff will be preparing for the students’ return in the fall. We stay committed to educating the essential workforce of tomorrow and will continue to demonstrate how We Work.

Sincerely,

Dr. Katie Leonard
President & CEO

To read the complete plan, please click here.


Posted on April 1, 2020 at 8:20 A.M.

Dear Campus Community,

All of us at Johnson College hope that you are all doing well and keeping yourself and your loved ones safe and healthy. Your well-being and safety are most important to us. We have been doing everything we can with the hopes of opening our doors back up for the remainder of this Spring semester. Unfortunately, with the extension of the social distancing guidelines, and Pennsylvania’s Stay at Home Order, we will not be able to be back on campus for the remainder of this semester. Due to these factors, the remainder of the semester will be taught online through D2L.

Commencement is an important tradition to our Johnson College community. During this extraordinary time, Johnson College believes our graduates should still have the opportunity to celebrate this occasion with their classmates, instructors, families, and friends. We have rescheduled our commencement ceremony to Saturday, August 8th, 2020.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank our students for being flexible and understanding of the situation that we are all in. I’ve been receiving wonderful feedback from them about how their classes are going and their interactions with instructors and staff.  Our students prove to us time and time again that they are up to any challenge that faces them. They are adaptable and hard-working, which are just a few of the traits that make them so successful.  

We would also like to acknowledge and give our gratitude to all those essential businesses who are working hard during this time to supply the life sustaining services that they provide. Thank you to our industry partners, alumni, and current students who are working on the front lines in the healthcare field, transportation, manufacturing, logistics, and food services. We couldn’t be more proud of you and thankful for all that you do.

And finally, I would like to give a big thank you to our faculty and staff. We truly would not be able to do what we do without you. Your dedication, innovative thinking, and quick response has made this transition to online learning as smooth as it could possibly be. Thank you for continuously going above and beyond for our students.

Stay strong and focused, Johnson College. As we navigate this new situation together, I want to remind everyone that it is temporary, and we are all in this together. Faculty and staff are still available to help students and are committed to helping them achieve their academic and career goals. We remain dedicated to delivering the best hands-on education that we can. Students will get their hands-on lab hours completed even though it may not be in the same traditional manner. But that is the great thing about Johnson College, we know how to respond quickly and creatively to find solutions. Even in times of adversity, we continue to show everyone just how we work.

Sincerely,

Dr. Katie Leonard
President & CEO


Posted on March 30, 2020 at 8:50 A.M.

Dear Campus Community,

For the safety of our students and for their loved ones, we have made the decision to postpone our annual commencement ceremony to Saturday August 8th, 2020 at 10:00 A.M. at the Theater at North [1539 N. Main Ave. in Scranton]. During this extraordinary time, Johnson College believes you should still have the opportunity to celebrate this occasion with your classmates, teachers, families, and friends.

A graduation practice will take place on Friday, August 7th, 2020 at 9 A.M. in the Moffat Building.
Students will still receive their cap and gown, have the opportunity to meet with college administrators, and will receive tickets for the event. The Office of the Registrar will also still issue diplomas to students.

Johnson College will have more information regarding Grad Finale and Awards Night in the coming weeks.


Posted on March 16, 2020 at 11:53 A.M.

Dear Campus Community,

Per the Governor’s instructions, and confirmed by PDE, we are considered a non-essential business and are requiring all employees to work from home starting tomorrow, March 17.  Please continue to be available to students. While the physical campus is closed, our staff and faculty must be available for students. Faculty, please continue your plans to get all course work online. We will continue to update you as we receive more information.

Instructional classes and campus labs will resume on Monday, March 23 in an online format through April 14. Students can log into D2L for specific class instructions. Students are encouraged to reach out to their faculty member with any questions on how a class will be delivered. All internships, clinicals, and off campus labs may continue, as long as the associated organization is operating. Students should be in contact with faculty members to know if an assigned organization is open.

All larger events have been postponed, including the Spring Career Fair. Alternative plans are being made for the Spring Open House. We will share additional information as plans develop.

Student housing will remain closed through April 14. Resident students with questions or extenuating individual circumstances should contact the Office of Student Engagement, (570) 702-8912, or e-mail Nolan Renz, Director of Student Engagement, at nrenz@johnson.edu.

Your health and safety is our top priority. Please use caution. If you, or a loved one, or someone you have been in contact with has been, or is sick, please do not come onto campus or attend any face to face experience. Continue to look to the CDC and other health related organizations for the most up to date and factual information:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/summary.html#anchor_1580064337377
Pennsylvania Department of Health
https://www.health.pa.gov/topics/disease/Pages/Coronavirus.aspx
Pennsylvania Emergency Preparedness Guide
https://www.ready.pa.gov/BeInformed/EmergencyPreparednessGuide/Pages/default.aspx

Thank you Johnson College community for working together to get through this most challenging and unprecedented time.

Sincerely,

Dr. Katie Leonard
President & CEO


Posted on March 11, 2020 at 2:03 pm.

Dear Johnson College families,

I wanted to reach out to you personally to share this information.

Effective Monday, March 16, as a precaution to reduce potential pathways for the spread of COVID-19 within our community, we are extending Spring Break. During this time, we will continue to assess the situation and plan further steps as we receive information. We plan to resume regular instruction on Monday, March 23.

In the meantime, we encourage you to follow the guidelines set forth by the CDC to protect yourself and help prevent the spreading of COVID-19. Although there are no confirmed cases, our students’ health and safety is the top priority.

Please see the letter below that was sent to the campus community earlier this week.

This is a difficult decision, and one we came to after many internal discussions with several constituent groups. I assure you that our faculty, staff, and administrators will continue to work to ensure that your student is safe and successful. We look forward to welcoming them back to campus soon.

Sincerely,

Dr. Katie Leonard

President & CEO


Dear Johnson College Community,
 
The Johnson College senior leadership team is committed to the health and wellbeing of our students, staff, faculty, and visitors. We wanted to take this time to update you on the latest information pertaining to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the preemptive measures we have already begun taking on our campus.
 
Facilities and custodial staff on campus thoroughly clean all classrooms, offices, and common areas on campus daily. The staff has changed cleaning products that are specifically formulated to be more effective against diseases such as the coronavirus. In addition, disinfecting wipes and hand sanitizing stations will be available in all buildings on campus, starting Monday, March 9, 2020.

In addition, our food service provider, Metz Culinary Management, has assembled a task force that will formulate action plans for all likely scenarios.  They are actively collaborating with key suppliers, relaunching ServSafe training for all employees and adding additional training regarding the spread and prevention of COVID-19.
 
You can protect yourself, and aid in the spreading of disease, by following the suggested prevention tips below:

  • Cover coughs or sneezes with your elbow. Do not use your hands!
  • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  • Clean surfaces frequently, including countertops, light switches, cell phones, remotes, and other frequently touched items.
  • Contain: if you are sick, stay home until you are feeling better.

Below you will find additional links to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Pennsylvania Department of Health regarding the virus as well as preventative measures you may take.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/summary.html#anchor_1580064337377
Pennsylvania Department of Health
https://www.health.pa.gov/topics/disease/Pages/Coronavirus.aspx
Pennsylvania Emergency Preparedness Guide
https://www.ready.pa.gov/BeInformed/EmergencyPreparednessGuide/Pages/default.aspx

We will continue to take the necessary precautions on campus and we encourage you to do the same at your homes.  To support these efforts, and to prevent the spread of illness, we recommend that if you are experiencing flu or cold symptoms, please stay home from work and school.
Thank you for your cooperation with this matter.

Sincerely,
Johnson College Senior Leadership Team

Johnson College Receives Accreditation by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education

Johnson College received official notice from the Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE) granting the College accreditation.

As a Middle States Commission on Higher Education accredited institution, students, families, and employees are assured of the quality and rigor of the educational experience provided by Johnson College. Being accredited also ensures that students who qualify may receive more federal financial aid options and that credits will transfer to and from other accredited institutions with more ease. Additionally, the MSCHE designation allows the use of a more streamlined process to add new program and increases our ability to solicit funding and grant opportunities to better prepare students to become part of the essential workforce in industries with which the College collaborates.

The affirmation comes following a huge undertaking that began in 2015. The College was awarded candidacy status in November of 2016. After the submission of Accreditation Readiness Reports, the College was approved for Self-Study in the spring of 2018. The entire College community engaged in a self-study process, which extended to 2-years due to the pandemic, involving staff, faculty, students, industry partners, board members, administration, and on-site and virtual visits from an MSCHE evaluation team.

“Becoming Middle States accredited means Johnson College will never settle for the status quo. We are committing ourselves to becoming a continuously improving organization, one that rises and succeeds together,” said Dr. Katie Leonard, President & CEO of Johnson College. “This accomplishment was achieved by the hard work of our entire campus community. When we work together, we make a difference in the lives of our students and, in turn, our community and region.”

The Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE) is a voluntary, non-governmental membership association that defines, maintains, and promotes educational excellence across institutions with diverse missions, student populations, and resources. It examines each institution as a whole and performs peer evaluation and institutional accreditation of colleges and universities in the Mid-Atlantic United States.

Johnson College provides real-world, hands-on learning in a caring environment and prepares graduates to enter into or advance their careers. Johnson College degrees become essential careers. Johnson College was founded in 1912 and is the region’s premier technical college, offering 15 associate degree and 3 academic certificate programs. A low student-to-teacher ratio supports an emphasis on hands-on instruction. Located in Scranton on a 44-acre campus, the College is an accredited, private, non-profit, co-educational institution with a strong tradition of working with regional businesses and industries to ensure a skilled and qualified workforce. For additional information on Johnson College, please call 1-800-2-WE-WORK, email enroll@johnson.edu, or visit Johnson.edu. 

Dr. Katie Leonard, President & CEO of Johnson College announced the Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE) accreditation during a Presidential Update Video distributed to the Johnson College community.  To watch this Presidential Update Video, please visit: https://youtu.be/uLa4Ar-2VS8.

Photo Caption: Recently Johnson College alumni, staff and students gathered to discuss the College’s grant of accreditation by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE). Pictured left to right: Front row – Brandon Dougherty, ’21, Electrical Construction & Maintenance Technology, Dr. Katie Leonard, President & CEO, Johnson College, and Joshua Shaver, ’20, Carpentry & Cabinetmaking Technology. Back row – Bill Burke, M.S., Vice President of Student and Academic Affairs, Johnson College, Dr. Kellyn Williams, Chief Academic Officer, Johnson College, Philip Davitt, Electrical Construction & Maintenance Technology student, and Barbara Byrne M.Ed., Associate Vice President of Faculty and College Planning, Johnson College. 

From Headlights to Taillights: Preparing for Summer Travel

By Mark Kozemko ’79, Johnson College’s Automotive Technology Program Director

Original published in the July 23, 2021 edition of the Valley Advantage.

https://www.thevalleyadvantage.com/community-columns/from-headlights-to-taillights-preparing-for-summer-travel/article_ada5ef18-e4fa-5a89-ba64-d81265ceadf6.html

Last month, we answered questions about what items to pack into a car care survival kit you’d take with you on a drive-away vacation. According to the response we received, it looks like you still have a few questions about getting your vehicle ready for summer travel. This month, we’ll cover some of the more specific questions we received over the past few weeks. Let’s get started.

Our first question is, “I don’t travel except for our annual vacation to the shore. Over the past three vacations, we used the same vehicle. Why is my fuel mileage different every year?”

There are several reasons your fuel mileage varies from year to year with the same vehicle.

First, I hope you’re performing a pre-travel inspection on your vehicle, including tire condition and air pressure, oil condition and level, transmission fluid condition and status and more.

If you are not performing that inspection, I highly recommend you do. Improper tire pressure alone can reduce fuel mileage significantly. Old or incorrect engine oil can lose its ability to lubricate correctly, causing the engine to work harder and use more fuel. The same goes for transmission fluid. If the transmission is not shifting correctly, your fuel mileage may decrease. The bottom line is, make sure all your fluids are up to par before you travel.

Second, road conditions can factor in your vehicle’s ability to get the most miles from a gallon of fuel. The friction between the road surface and the tire can cause unnecessary drag and make the engine work harder. The constant stopping and starting in construction areas also factors into decreased fuel mileage.

Third, driving habits are a huge factor in getting good to excellent fuel mileage. The more you follow posted speed limits and start from a stop, smoothly, you will see an increase in your fuel mileage.

For example, I recently purchased a new truck — used, but new to me. It has an eight-cylinder engine, as did my old truck, but slightly bigger. My old truck got a whopping 11-12 miles per gallon with my driving habits. With the same driving habits, mostly highway driving, the new truck consistently gets about 3-4 mpg better. When I drive to and from work, 20 miles each way, through the small cities and towns, follow speed limits and don’t push my engine to outperform itself, the truck is getting just under 20 mpg, which is a lot better than the 11-12 mpg I was getting with my old truck.

If you are a seasoned driver, you may ask yourself, isn’t highway mileage supposed to be more than city mileage? It’s written on vehicle window stickers that way. The fact is, newer models have engine and transmission options designed to, if driven correctly, increase fuel mileage.

“Why does my air conditioning cut out when I accelerate?” is our second question.

More than likely, this issue is a cracked or broken vacuum line to your heating, ventilation and air conditioning control unit. If you pay close attention when your air conditioning cuts out, you’ll notice it doesn’t really cut out. The airflow changes direction. It may be redirected to the floor or defroster vents.

This redirection happens because when you accelerate, you decrease the vacuum that your engine creates. When you reach cruising speed, or let up a bit on the accelerator pedal, you’ll probably notice the airflow returns to the dashboard vents.

You can self-diagnose this issue if you’re a Mr. or Ms. Fix It, or, you can have your repair garage look into it. Newer vehicles have electronic controls that virtually eliminate this issue. Of course, other things can go wrong in these systems, so keep your eyes on them.

Our third and last question of the month is “How do I know the correct tire pressure for my vehicle?”

Usually, the manufacturer puts a sticker in the driver’s door jamb that indicates the correct tire pressure. If you don’t see it there, it may be stuck to the fuel door or in the fuel filler neck area. If a tire pressure sticker is not on your vehicle, the best thing to do is to google the make and model of your vehicle to find out proper tire pressure. Whatever you do, DO NOT fill to the maximum pressure found on the tire itself. It is not the correct operating pressure and may cause a dangerous situation. Go by what is listed on the sticker, not the tire itself.

I hope everyone enjoys the rest of the summer. Drive sensibly and stay safe.

Now Enrolling Students from Wayne, Pike and Susquehanna Counties into Free Distance Learning Program

Johnson College is now enrolling students for its new free Distance Learning Program. This remote education program for high school and adult students in the rural areas of Wayne, Pike, and Susquehanna counties launches on August 30, 2021.  It creates a direct route for students to complete any of Johnson College’s 15 academic programs and ultimately a fulfilling career with family-sustaining wages while staying in their communities. To learn more about this program or to register for courses listed below, please visit Johnson.edu/usda-registration or email the Johnson College enrollment team at enroll@johnson.edu.

Students will have interactive, two-way access to Johnson College faculty and participate in remote education, discussions, testing, and skill demonstrations via high-tech telecommunications equipment in classrooms at Forest City Regional High School, Honesdale High School, Wallenpaupack Area High School, and Western Wayne High School. In addition, Lakeville Library, Newfoundland Library, and Pleasant Mount Library will be equipped with laptops to give community residents access to career exploration services and information about courses at Johnson College. 

In addition to the distance learning opportunity this program provides, students will have access to Johnson College’s full array of on-campus support services including tutoring, counseling, career services, financial aid, internship opportunities, and exposure to industry from day one. Distance learning will help high school and adult students reach their full potential and connect with the region’s essential careers already in demand.

This program is funded in part by a grant from the United States Department of Agriculture’s Distance Learning and Telemedicine Grant Program. 

Courses available through Honesdale High School

ART 101-1-Blueprint Reading for Welders – Wednesdays and Fridays, 4 p.m. – 4:50 p.m.

MAT 100-1- Math for Welders – Thursdays, 5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

BTT 149-4 – Construction Safety – Mondays, 5 p.m. – 6:50 p.m.

MAT 123-1 – Math for Carpenters – Thursdays, 4 p.m. – 4:50 p.m.

ART 110-4 – Contract Drawings – Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Courses available through Wallenpaupack Area High School

CIT 181 – 1 – Computer Hardware and Operating System – Online, available anytime

CIT 182 – 2 – Computer Hardware and Operating System Lab – Thursdays, 7 p.m. – 8:50 p.m.

CIT 183 – 1 – Network Architectures, Principles, and Protocols – Online, available anytime

CIT 184 – 3 – Network Architectures, Principles, and Protocols Lab – Wednesdays, 6 p.m. – 7:50 p.m.

PRG 101 – 2 – Programming for the Enterprise – Wednesdays, 3 p.m. – 5:50 p.m. 

Courses available through Western Wayne High School

VMR 151-2 – Introduction to Vehicle Maintenance – Wednesdays, 5 p.m. – 5:50 p.m. 

VMR 153-2 – Brake Systems – Tuesdays, 5 p.m. – 6:50 p.m.

VMR 154-3 – Brake Systems Lab – Tuesdays, 7 p.m. – 8:50 p.m.

VMR 155-3 – Steering & Suspensions – Thursdays, 5 p.m. – 6:50 p.m. 

VMR 156-3 – Steering & Suspensions Lab – Thursdays, 7 p.m. – 8:50 p.m.  

Courses available through Forest City Regional High School

ART 110-4 – Contract Drawings – Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

ADT 151-1 – Introduction to CAD – Online, available anytime 

ADT-152-2 – Introduction to CAD Lab – M-F, 11 a.m. – 12:06 p.m.

BUS 101-4 – Introduction to Business – Mondays, 5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Enroll Now in Fundamentals of Welding Class

Johnson College’s Continuing Education Program is currently enrolling students in its next Fundamentals of Welding class, scheduled for September on its campus in Scranton. Space is very limited.

Students will learn the basics of the major welding processes. After fundamentals, students can enroll in an intermediate class in either Shielded Metal Arc Welding (Stick), Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (TIG), or Gas Metal Arc Welding (MIG). Each of these classes works toward plate certification to a common welding code.

To learn more or enroll contact the Johnson College Continuing Education department at 570-702-8979, email continuinged@johnson.edu, or visit https://johnson.edu/continuingeducation/.