Tech Talk with Johnson College Podcast – Episode 4 Now Live

Tech Talk with Johnson College Podcast Episode 4, “Information Technology and It’s Effect on Our Lives” is live. In this episode Dr. Katie Leonard talks with Johnson College’s own Matt Cirba. They discuss how educators rely on technology to interact with students throughout the pandemic and how it will impact our world in the future.

Visit https://johnsoncollegepodcast.com/ to listen to all of the Tech Talk with Johnson College Podcast episodes and learn more.

Our guest, Matt Cirba, is currently a full-time instructor at Johnson College in the Computer Information Technology program. Matt has an A.S. from Johnson College, a B.S. from Keystone College, and a M.S. Ed from Wilkes University. In summer seasons, he works part-time for minor league baseball. Before teaching, he was working as an information technology consultant for 6 years in the field helping to take service calls, repair technology, implement new resources, and construct networks for businesses.

Matt is the creator and owner of Garlic Jar Media, established in April 2020. He strives to produce podcast and other multimedia for everyone to enjoy. Matt hosts their new hit podcast show titled: The Garlic Jar Podcast Show. They discuss pop culture topics, news, and today’s biggest interests/trends. You can listen to the podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Podomatic, and other online media platforms.

From Headlights to Taillights: Clearing the Air

By Mark Kozemko, Johnson College’s Automotive Technology Program Director

Original published in the September 4, 2020 edition of the Valley Advantage. https://www.thevalleyadvantage.com/community-columns/from-headlights-to-taillights-clearing-the-air/article_d51da5d8-cb42-5c02-b5df-ebb3c0c00f44.html

We all try to breathe the cleanest air possible. Our body’s natural air filter located in our breathing system usually does a fine job. Unless, of course, we have a cold or allergy which results in a stuffy nose. When this happens we can’t breathe properly. The condition makes us feel tired and sluggish. We’ve all been there, right?

If your vehicle’s engine or heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) breathing systems can’t breathe correctly, your vehicle gets tired and sluggish, too. This is caused by your vehicle’s air filters not performing properly due to being dirty, or simple wear and tear.

Today, we’re talking about air filters that help your vehicle breathe. Below are a few questions I received about vehicle air filters. So let’s get started.

The first question is, “Are there different types of air filters in a car, and what do they do?”

Yes, each vehicle has different types of air filters. Late model vehicles have at least two different air filters as standard equipment. The first filter is the engine intake air filter and the second is the heating/cooling system intake air filter, or cabin filter. If you have a vehicle equipped with air brakes, normally a heavy duty truck, it will also have an intake air filter for the air compressor, which is the heart of the air brakes.

Now let’s talk about what each one does for your vehicle.

The engine intake air filter is designed to filter the air that the engine uses for combustion in the cylinders. Not only does it filter the air going into an engine, it allows the proper amount of air in to produce optimum combustion. When an engine intake air filter is dirty, the air flow becomes restricted and combustion may not be complete. The restricted air flow causes an engine to run poorly and use more fuel because the cylinders are not getting the correct amount of air. This condition will decrease fuel mileage and may also cause black smoke from the exhaust.

The cabin air filter filters air coming into the passenger compartment/cabin. Modern vehicles have systems constantly circulating air through the cabin using outside air. The filter catches pollutants, debris and allergens that can get into your vehicle. This filter can get clogged and pretty nasty. If you ever see a dirty cabin filter, it will make you wonder about the air we breathe on a regular basis.

The intake air filter inside air brakes filters air taken into the compressor used to operate the air brake system. Needless to say, if this filter blocks up and restricts air flow to the compressor, the results can be devastating because the brakes will not work.

You vehicle’s air filters should be checked often. If the filters are left unchecked, engines may run poorly, cabin air quality and air flow may diminish, or brake systems will not function properly.

“How often do they need to be changed?” is our second question.

Manufacturers suggest service intervals for each of the air filters in your vehicle. These service intervals are for vehicles driven in what manufactures call normal conditions. Driving on dirt or dusty roads, through construction areas — we know there are plenty of those in northeastern Pennsylvania — and poor air quality are contributors to decreasing the lifespan of your air filters. At the very least, you should always follow the service and replacement intervals noted in your vehicle’s owner’s manual. As with any service, it doesn’t hurt to do it more often but I recommend that you don’t extend the time between air filter services.

Our final question is, “Can the filters be changed by owners or must they be changed by technicians?”

If you’re an owner who is comfortable performing some of your own maintenance, you shouldn’t have any challenges replacing the engine intake or cabin filters. Keep in mind some cabin filters are very hard to find because they’re tucked under the dashboard. If you’re not comfortable, by all means, have your repair shop do the service.

You may not see your vehicle’s air filters or even think about them often, but they do need your, or a service technician’s, attention from time to time. They’re vital to keeping your vehicle performing efficiently and making sure you and your passengers breathe the cleanest air possible.

The next Headlights to Taillights column will be published in the September 25, 2020 edition of the Valley Advantage.  

Johnson College Receives $3,500 PPL Foundation Grant

Johnson College was awarded a $3,500 grant from the PPL Foundation to support its STEM Energy Outreach Program in five northeastern Pennsylvania school districts.  This program will introduce at least 50 middle and high school students to green, renewable energy through solar concepts using an interactive, hands on demonstration. To participate schools must email Kellyn Williams, PhD, Chief Academic Officer at Johnson College at knolan@johnson.edu. Space is limited.

Students will participate in the interactive learning experience by assembling K’nex Education Renewable Energy sets during a live zoom class with Johnson College Chief Academic Officer, Dr. Kellyn Williams. They will also watch online presentations featuring Richard Fornes, Johnson College Electrical Engineering program director, and Cole Hastings Goldstein, Johnson College Advanced Manufacturing program director. The completed K’nex kits will be shared with additional schools as part of future Johnson College STEM Outreach Programs.

“The PPL Foundation grant gives local middle and high school students the opportunity to experience the real-world, hands-on learning our amazing faculty provides students on the Johnson College campus” said Dr. Katie Leonard, Johnson College President and CEO. “Our STEM Outreach Programs provide local students an introduction to careers within essential industries throughout northeastern Pennsylvania and the country.”  

Johnson College previously presented STEM Outreach Programs at the Scranton School District, Weatherly Middle School, Carbondale High School, Wallenpaupack School District, and Forest City School District.   

The PPL Foundation awards annual grants through a competitive application and review process.  Through strategic partnerships, the Foundation supports organizations working to create vibrant, sustainable communities; promote diversity, equity and inclusion; and empower each citizen to fulfill her or his potential. Learn more about the PPL Foundation at https://www.pplweb.com/communities/ppl-foundation/.

(L to R): Dr. Kellyn Williams, Johnson College’s chief academic officer holding a solar powered vehicle students will build, Alana Roberts, regional affairs director at the PPL Foundation, and Dr. Katie Leonard, Johnson College’s president and CEO, holding a Solar Energy Program t-shirt participating students will receive.   

New Board Members and Officers for 2020-2021

Johnson College announces that four new members have recently joined the Board of Directors and new officers have been elected. New board members include Ashley H. Bechaver, Candy J. Frye ’94, Steve M. Pierson ’06, and Stephen E. Midura. New officers include Marianne Gilmartin, Esq., Chair; Christopher J. Haran, Vice Chair; and J. Patrick Dietz, Treasurer.

Ms. Ashley H. Bechaver is in Human Resources/IT at Gibbons Ford in Dickson City. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Communications, Legal, Institutions, Economics, and Government from American University. Ms. Bechaver has served on the Automotive Program Advisory Committee at Johnson College, Lackawanna Career Technology Center, and West Side Technology Center. She resides in Throop.

Mrs. Candy J. Frye is Director of New Business Development at A. Pickett Construction, Inc. in Kingston. Frye is a 1995 graduate of the building construction technology and architectural drafting and design associate degree programs at Johnson College. She resides in Harding.

Mr. Steve M. Pierson is the Service Manager at Five Star International Trucks, LLC. In Allentown. Pierson is a 2006 graduate of the diesel truck technology program at Johnson College. He resides in Sellersville.

Mr. Stephen Midura is the Market Director at Johnson Controls in Wilkes-Barre. Midura holds a bachelor’s degree in architectural engineering/business administration from Penn State and a MBA from Marywood. He resides in Scott Township.

Atty. Marianne Gilmartin is the new chair of the board. She joined the Johnson College board of directors in 2014. Atty. Gilmartin has served on the Executive Committee, Governance Committee, Human Resources Committee, and Board Committee Restructuring Taskforce. She was the Chair of the Academic Achievement & Student Engagement Committee in 2017-18. Atty. Gilmartin has brought her skills as an attorney and as a leader in the community to her work on the board. She is an attorney and shareholder at Stevens & Lee and holds a Juris Doctorate from Seton Hall University. She resides in Moscow.

Mr. Christopher J. Haran is the new Vice Chair of the board. He joined the Johnson College board of directors in 2012. Mr. Haran has been instrumental in serving on the Governance Committee, most notably his work with board assessment initiatives. He holds a Master of Science degree in Management Science from Stony Brook University. Mr. Haran works professionally as a consultant and adjunct professor. He resides in Moscow.

Mr. J. Patrick Dietz is the new Treasurer of the board and brings the knowledge of his longtime career in banking to that position. He joined the Johnson College board in 2017 and is also a member of the Audit, Operational Excellence, and Governance Committees. Mr. Dietz is also the Chairman of the Salvation Army of Scranton Advisory Board. He obtained his MBA from Marywood University and is a Senior Vice President / Commercial Loan Officer at Peoples Security Bank and Trust Company. Mr. Dietz resides in South Abington Township with his wife Christine.

To see a complete listing the 2020-2021 Board of Directors visit https://johnson.edu/about/office-of-the-president/board-of-directors/.

Spring 2020 President’s List

Dr. Katie Leonard, President & CEO of Johnson College, has announced the President’s List of students who have completed the 2020 Spring Semester with a grade point average of 3.90 or higher.

All students are from Pennsylvania.

Frank Buono. Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning, Clarks Green

Jason Chilko, Automotive Technology, Bartonsville

Kyle Colarusso, Logistics and Supply Chain Management, Moosic

William DesChenes, Automotive Technology, Greentown

Brittany Doran, Radiologic Technology, Avoca

Alexander Dubas, Computer Information Technology, Clarks Summit

Danny Fuentes, Physical Therapist Assistant, Edwardsville

Brian Hill, Computer Information Technology, Scranton

David Hudak, Advanced Manufacturing Engineering Technology, Scott Twp.

Justin Kemble, Computer Information Technology, Scranton

Stephanie Laskowski, Automotive Technology, Covington Twp.

John Lee, Computer Information Technology, Old Forge

Helga Linhares, Physical Therapist Assistant, Clarks Green

Cody Mackin, Architectural Drafting & Design Technology, Taylor

Regina McCaffery, Radiologic Technology, Pocono Summit

Dominic Motta, Diesel Truck Technology, Pocono Lake

Rodrigue Ngongo, Computer Information Technology, Scranton

Kimberly Rivera Mendoza, Veterinary Technology, Wilkes-Barre

Sean Shearin, Heating Ventilation & Air Conditioning, Madison Twp.

Kiran Singh, Veterinary Technology, Putney

Colby Southivong, Computer Information Technology, Scranton

Joseph Stoffey, Computer Information Technology, Jessup

Christopher Taylor, Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning, Waymart

Patrick Teeple, Automotive Technology, Carbondale

Diana Warrington, Veterinary Technology, Tafton

David Weaver, Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning, Carbondale

Kerri Wydeen, Radiologic Technology, Scott Twp.

Thomas Zaltauskas, Diesel Truck Technology, Scranton

Continuing Education Program Offers 285 Hour CNC Training Course

Johnson College’s Continuing Education Program’s 285 hour non-credit certificate Computer Numerical Control training will begin on Monday, October 5, 2020 and will run Mondays through Thursdays from 4 p.m. to 10:15 p.m. on the Johnson College campus in Scranton. To learn more or enroll call 570-702-8979 or email continuinged@johnson.edu.

The training is designed for individuals looking to enter the high-demand machining field and will cover the theory and hands-on practice of both conventional and high-demand machining field. Students will learn blueprint reading, and math with an emphasis on the use of metals and the stresses placed upon them.

Johnson College’s Continuing Education Program distinguishes itself from the College’s 2-year degree programs and certificate courses by providing its adult students the opportunity to improve their skills to stay ahead of the competition, learn new technologies, and advance in their current career. Industry partners utilize and recognize the Continuing Education courses, many taught by industry professionals, because they’re developed in partnership with industry. Johnson College strategizes with and listens to its partners when creating the most effective hands-on continuing education curriculum and programs. Some courses are specifically customized toward industry partners’ workforce needs in reducing possible skills gaps and industry requirements. Johnson College also assists individual students and industry partners in obtaining funding or grants so their continuing education courses are cost effective. Learn more about Johnson College’s Continuing Education Program at Johnson.edu/continuing-education.

Continuing Education Program Offers Online Healthcare Courses

Johnson College’s Continuing Education Program is offering four exclusive online Healthcare courses. They include: Clinical Medical Assistant, Electronic Health Records Management, Medical Billing & Coding, and Pharmacy Technician. To learn more about the online courses or enroll visit https://johnson.edu/continuing-education/or call 570-702-8979.

Students who enroll in Johnson College’s exclusive online courses learn at their own pace and on their own schedule. The education and training these courses provide give students the opportunity to advance in or begin new careers in Healthcare, one of our region’s essential industries.

The Clinical Medical Assistant course is designed to prepare students to function as professionals in multiple healthcare settings. Medical assistants with a clinical background perform various clinical tasks including assisting with the administration of medications and with minor procedures, performing an EKG electrocardiogram, obtaining laboratory specimens for testing, educating patients, and other related tasks. Job opportunities are prevalent with physician’s offices, clinics, chiropractor’s offices, hospitals and outpatient facilities.

The Electronic Health Records Management course prepares students to understand and use electronic records in a medical practice. Students will review the implementation and management of electronic health information using common electronic data interchange systems and maintaining the medical, legal, accreditation and regulatory requirements of the electronic health record.

The Medical Billing & Coding course offers the skills needed to perform complex coding and billing procedures. The course covers: CPT (Introduction, Guidelines, Evaluation and Management), specialty fields (such as surgery, radiology and laboratory), the ICD-10 for both diagnosis and procedure coding, and basic claims processes for insurance reimbursements.

The Pharmacy Technician course will prepare students to enter the pharmacy field and take the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board’s PTCB exam. Content includes pharmacy medical terminology, reading and interpreting prescriptions and defining generic and brand named drugs and much, much more. 

Johnson College’s Continuing Education Program distinguishes itself from the College’s 2-year degree programs and certificate courses by providing its adult students the opportunity to improve their skills to stay ahead of the competition, learn new technologies, and advance in their current career.

Johnson College Continuing Education courses, many taught by industry professionals, are utilized and recognized by industry partners because they’re developed in partnership with industry. Johnson College also assists individual students and industry partners in obtaining funding or grants so their continuing education courses are cost effective. Learn more about Johnson College’s Continuing Education Program at Johnson.edu/continuing-education.

Tech Talk with Johnson College Podcast – Episode 3 Now Live

Tech Talk with Johnson College Podcast Episode 3, “The Job Demand and Who is Qualified for those Careers?” is live. Listen as Dr. Katie Leonard continues her conversation with Teri Ooms, Executive Director at The Institute for Public Policy & Economic Development.

The path to a successful career is not one straight track. Dr. Katie Leonard and Teri Ooms discuss the endless opportunities available to students today and what the future holds for in-demand careers.

Visit https://johnsoncollegepodcast.com/ to listen to all of the Tech Talk with Johnson College Podcast episodes and learn more.

Our guest Teri Ooms is responsible for all facets of research,organizational strategy, and management at The Institute for Public Policy & Economic Development. Teri is an active principal investigator in all Institute research. She has been nationally recognized as a leader in regional economic development. She turned that skill into a research institute to help other regions develop and prosper. Her strategic skills have allowed The Institute to expand its services to the private and non-profit sectors for research and analysis in community health needs assessments, strategic planning, market and feasibility studies, and economic impact analysis. Ooms’ leadership has expanded The Institute’s work to other states. Under her direction, The Institute has completed over 100 client and community based studies. These studies have resulted in new jobs, new programs, sustained initiatives, and new legislation throughout Pennsylvania and in New York.

Learn more about the The Institute for Public Policy & Economic Development at https://www.institutepa.org/.

Headlights to Taillights: When The Rubber Hits The Road

By Mark Kozemko, Johnson College’s Automotive Technology program director
Original published in the July 24, 2020 edition of the Valley Advantage. https://www.thevalleyadvantage.com/community-columns/from-headlights-to-taillights-when-the-rubber-hits-the-road/article_79003ac2-8a5d-50c9-9ff5-aeec7c6f96f4.html

Most vehicle owners rely on some sort of repair shop or repair technician to take care of their vehicle, much like we all rely on our doctors to take care of our bodies. So today, we’re talking about how to take care of your vehicle’s feet, the tires. Several questions have been brought to my attention regarding tires. So let’s get started.

The first question is: “How important are good tires?”

This is a loaded question because the definition of a “good” tire may differ from one person to the next. First off, let’s change good to safe. Safety is the top priority. Several conditions will deem a tire unsafe. This includes low tread depth, uneven wear, low tire pressure and rubber deterioration, also known as dry rot.

If all of the vehicle suspension components and steering geometry, or alignment, are in good condition, tires will wear evenly and you will get the most out of them as possible. If there are worn suspension parts or the alignment is off, then tires will wear unevenly and require replacement more often. When tires are replaced because of uneven wear, it may indicate a problem other than tires. If this is the case, have your suspension parts and the alignment checked.

“What effect do tires have on the overall wear and tear of my vehicle?” is our second question.

Let’s start with an easy analogy. It’s summer time, so we’ll use a beach ball as an example. Picture a flat level surface and a beach ball. With the correct amount of air pressure the ball will roll smoothly over the surface and reach the finish line. Now take air pressure away and try to roll the ball. The ball will not roll as smoothly and will have to be pushed more often to get it to the finish line. On the other extreme, you now have a ball with too much air pressure. This ball rolls OK but every imperfection in the surface causes the ball to bounce, which may throw the ball off course.

What does this all mean? Simply, correct tire pressure is critical to obtaining optimum performance from your tires and from all of your vehicle systems. Too little pressure causes tires to wear on both inner and outer shoulders and, like the ball needing more power to get across the finish line, your engine will work harder than it should to get you moving. Too much air in the tire causes it to bounce excessively, causing premature wear on suspension parts. A wear pattern on the tires will resemble cups in the tread called cupping. If the pressure is too high but not high enough to cause bouncing, the tire will wear in the center all the way around, requiring replacement.

Most, if not all vehicles produced since 2010 are equipped with a Tire Pressure Monitoring System. This system monitors the air pressure in your tires. If your vehicle isn’t equipped with a Tire Pressure Monitoring System, it’s important for you to check your tire pressure regularly, usually every other stop at the gas station.

Now to our last question. “Are snow tires really necessary?”

Well, yes and no. it all depends on your comfort zone on driving without them. Winter tires, formally known as snow tires, provide increased driver confidence along with added traction to get you to your destination. If you use winter tires on all-wheel drive vehicles and SUVs, make sure you use four of them. I also recommend running winter tires on all four wheels on a rear-wheel or front-wheel drive vehicles.

To conclude, as with everything, tire technology has greatly advanced. If you’re comfortable enough to determine the condition of your tires and you believe they need to be replaced, by all means, do it.

If you aren’t sure, like most vehicle owners, build a relationship with a repair shop or dealer. Trusting your body or vehicle to others are big steps. When you find the right doctor or repair shop it gives you the best opportunity to keep you or your vehicle running efficiently and safely.

The next Headlights to Taillights column will be published in the August 28, 2020 edition of the Valley Advantage.