OBDII Emissions Training Class

Johnson College’s Continuing Education Program is currently enrolling students into its inaugural OBDII Emissions Training class. The class will be held on the Johnson College campus on Monday, Oct. 26, 2020 and Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2020 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., and conclude with testing on Thursday, Oct. 29, 2020 at 6 p.m. Space is very limited to allow for social distancing. To learn more or enroll call 570-702-8979 or email continuinged@johnson.edu.

The OBDII computer monitors a vehicle’s emission control systems in real-time and is capable of informing a motorist or technician of a systemic issue the moment it occurs. The system operates through a series of indicator lights, drive cycles, trouble codes and readiness monitors. During an inspection, an emission analyzer scan tool plugs into the diagnostic connector that is attached to the OBDII computer and communicates with the vehicle. The OBDII computer relays to the scan tool whether it has discovered errors in the emission control systems. The emission analyzer then determines whether the vehicle is being operated in compliance with emission standards. For more information about the OBDII Emissions Training class visit https://johnson.edu/continuing-education/odbii-emissions-licensing/.

The class fee of $180 is paid to Johnson College and a study material and testing fee of $39.99 is paid directly to the PA Training Portal.

Johnson College Masks Now Available

Johnson College branded masks are now available!! Each mask is $20 with proceeds benefiting the College’s Student Emergency Fund. Visit https://shop.shopnunzis.com/jcmasks/shop/home to purchase your masks today!

The Johnson College Student Emergency Fund helps students if they have an unforeseeable expense related to their schooling, such as the loss of job due to COVID-19, loss of family member who was supporting them, etc. This fund is supported through contributions from members of our Johnson College Community like you. Thank you for supporting our students.

The Johnson College masks have adjustable ear loops and a metal piece on the nose for a comfortable fit.

Continuing Education Program Offers Welding Basics Class

Johnson College’s Continuing Education Program is now enrolling students into it’s Welding Basics class that will be held on Saturday, October 24, 2020 from 8am-12pm on the Johnson College campus in Scranton. Class cost is $150.

The Welding Basics class will provide the basic knowledge and skills for various forms of welding (MIG, TIG & Stick).  Students will learn basic terms and definitions, welding safety and machine setup. Each student will also have the opportunity to try their hand in the booth for basic welding demonstration.

Space is limited. To learn more or enroll call 570-702-8979 or email continuinged@johnson.edu.

Tech Talk with Johnson College Podcast – Episode 4 Now Live

Tech Talk with Johnson College Podcast Episode 4, “Information Technology and It’s Effect on Our Lives” is live. In this episode Dr. Katie Leonard talks with Johnson College’s own Matt Cirba. They discuss how educators rely on technology to interact with students throughout the pandemic and how it will impact our world in the future.

Visit https://johnsoncollegepodcast.com/ to listen to all of the Tech Talk with Johnson College Podcast episodes and learn more.

Our guest, Matt Cirba, is currently a full-time instructor at Johnson College in the Computer Information Technology program. Matt has an A.S. from Johnson College, a B.S. from Keystone College, and a M.S. Ed from Wilkes University. In summer seasons, he works part-time for minor league baseball. Before teaching, he was working as an information technology consultant for 6 years in the field helping to take service calls, repair technology, implement new resources, and construct networks for businesses.

Matt is the creator and owner of Garlic Jar Media, established in April 2020. He strives to produce podcast and other multimedia for everyone to enjoy. Matt hosts their new hit podcast show titled: The Garlic Jar Podcast Show. They discuss pop culture topics, news, and today’s biggest interests/trends. You can listen to the podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Podomatic, and other online media platforms.

From Headlights to Taillights: Clearing the Air

By Mark Kozemko, Johnson College’s Automotive Technology Program Director

Original published in the September 4, 2020 edition of the Valley Advantage. https://www.thevalleyadvantage.com/community-columns/from-headlights-to-taillights-clearing-the-air/article_d51da5d8-cb42-5c02-b5df-ebb3c0c00f44.html

We all try to breathe the cleanest air possible. Our body’s natural air filter located in our breathing system usually does a fine job. Unless, of course, we have a cold or allergy which results in a stuffy nose. When this happens we can’t breathe properly. The condition makes us feel tired and sluggish. We’ve all been there, right?

If your vehicle’s engine or heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) breathing systems can’t breathe correctly, your vehicle gets tired and sluggish, too. This is caused by your vehicle’s air filters not performing properly due to being dirty, or simple wear and tear.

Today, we’re talking about air filters that help your vehicle breathe. Below are a few questions I received about vehicle air filters. So let’s get started.

The first question is, “Are there different types of air filters in a car, and what do they do?”

Yes, each vehicle has different types of air filters. Late model vehicles have at least two different air filters as standard equipment. The first filter is the engine intake air filter and the second is the heating/cooling system intake air filter, or cabin filter. If you have a vehicle equipped with air brakes, normally a heavy duty truck, it will also have an intake air filter for the air compressor, which is the heart of the air brakes.

Now let’s talk about what each one does for your vehicle.

The engine intake air filter is designed to filter the air that the engine uses for combustion in the cylinders. Not only does it filter the air going into an engine, it allows the proper amount of air in to produce optimum combustion. When an engine intake air filter is dirty, the air flow becomes restricted and combustion may not be complete. The restricted air flow causes an engine to run poorly and use more fuel because the cylinders are not getting the correct amount of air. This condition will decrease fuel mileage and may also cause black smoke from the exhaust.

The cabin air filter filters air coming into the passenger compartment/cabin. Modern vehicles have systems constantly circulating air through the cabin using outside air. The filter catches pollutants, debris and allergens that can get into your vehicle. This filter can get clogged and pretty nasty. If you ever see a dirty cabin filter, it will make you wonder about the air we breathe on a regular basis.

The intake air filter inside air brakes filters air taken into the compressor used to operate the air brake system. Needless to say, if this filter blocks up and restricts air flow to the compressor, the results can be devastating because the brakes will not work.

You vehicle’s air filters should be checked often. If the filters are left unchecked, engines may run poorly, cabin air quality and air flow may diminish, or brake systems will not function properly.

“How often do they need to be changed?” is our second question.

Manufacturers suggest service intervals for each of the air filters in your vehicle. These service intervals are for vehicles driven in what manufactures call normal conditions. Driving on dirt or dusty roads, through construction areas — we know there are plenty of those in northeastern Pennsylvania — and poor air quality are contributors to decreasing the lifespan of your air filters. At the very least, you should always follow the service and replacement intervals noted in your vehicle’s owner’s manual. As with any service, it doesn’t hurt to do it more often but I recommend that you don’t extend the time between air filter services.

Our final question is, “Can the filters be changed by owners or must they be changed by technicians?”

If you’re an owner who is comfortable performing some of your own maintenance, you shouldn’t have any challenges replacing the engine intake or cabin filters. Keep in mind some cabin filters are very hard to find because they’re tucked under the dashboard. If you’re not comfortable, by all means, have your repair shop do the service.

You may not see your vehicle’s air filters or even think about them often, but they do need your, or a service technician’s, attention from time to time. They’re vital to keeping your vehicle performing efficiently and making sure you and your passengers breathe the cleanest air possible.

The next Headlights to Taillights column will be published in the September 25, 2020 edition of the Valley Advantage.  

Johnson College Receives $3,500 PPL Foundation Grant

Johnson College was awarded a $3,500 grant from the PPL Foundation to support its STEM Energy Outreach Program in five northeastern Pennsylvania school districts.  This program will introduce at least 50 middle and high school students to green, renewable energy through solar concepts using an interactive, hands on demonstration. To participate schools must email Kellyn Williams, PhD, Chief Academic Officer at Johnson College at knolan@johnson.edu. Space is limited.

Students will participate in the interactive learning experience by assembling K’nex Education Renewable Energy sets during a live zoom class with Johnson College Chief Academic Officer, Dr. Kellyn Williams. They will also watch online presentations featuring Richard Fornes, Johnson College Electrical Engineering program director, and Cole Hastings Goldstein, Johnson College Advanced Manufacturing program director. The completed K’nex kits will be shared with additional schools as part of future Johnson College STEM Outreach Programs.

“The PPL Foundation grant gives local middle and high school students the opportunity to experience the real-world, hands-on learning our amazing faculty provides students on the Johnson College campus” said Dr. Katie Leonard, Johnson College President and CEO. “Our STEM Outreach Programs provide local students an introduction to careers within essential industries throughout northeastern Pennsylvania and the country.”  

Johnson College previously presented STEM Outreach Programs at the Scranton School District, Weatherly Middle School, Carbondale High School, Wallenpaupack School District, and Forest City School District.   

The PPL Foundation awards annual grants through a competitive application and review process.  Through strategic partnerships, the Foundation supports organizations working to create vibrant, sustainable communities; promote diversity, equity and inclusion; and empower each citizen to fulfill her or his potential. Learn more about the PPL Foundation at https://www.pplweb.com/communities/ppl-foundation/.

(L to R): Dr. Kellyn Williams, Johnson College’s chief academic officer holding a solar powered vehicle students will build, Alana Roberts, regional affairs director at the PPL Foundation, and Dr. Katie Leonard, Johnson College’s president and CEO, holding a Solar Energy Program t-shirt participating students will receive.