Johnson College to Host 29th Annual Golf Tournament

The 29th Annual Johnson College Open will be held on Friday, May 20, 2022, at Pine Hills Country Club in Taylor, PA (rain or shine).  Proceeds from this annual golf tournament support the Johnson College Presidential Scholarship Fund. Each academic year, Presidential Scholarships are awarded to four qualified and deserving full-time students.

Sponsors of the 29th Annual Johnson College Open to date include:

Presenting Sponsor: Gerrity’s Supermarkets

Advertising Sponsor: Lamar Advertising

Platinum Marketing Sponsor: Sweda Advertising

Gold Print Sponsor: Sprint Print

Gold Sponsors: Eastern Atlantic States Regional Council of Carpenters, Fastenal Company, L.R. Costanzo Company, Inc., Peoples Security Bank & Trust, PNC Bank, Shea Demolition, Simplex Homes, Stevens & Lee, and Vacendak Construction,

Silver Sponsors: Toyota of Scranton, ecampus.com

Cart Sponsor: ShopRite

Breakfast Sponsor: Troy Mechanical, Inc.

Pot O’ Gold Sponsor: Cristiano Welding Supply

Gift Sponsor: Sordoni Construction Services, Inc.

Cocktail Sponsor – Topp Business Solutions

Mulligan Sponsor: Milnes Engineering, Construction, and Surveying

Hole in One Sponsor: Gibbons Ford

Photo Caption:

Recently, sponsors of the 29th Annual Johnson College Open met on the Johnson College campus to discuss the event being held on Friday, May 20, 2022, at Pine Hills Country Club in Taylor, PA.  Proceeds from this annual golf tournament support the Johnson College Presidential Scholarship Fund. Left to Right – Front row: Ashley Bechaver – Gibbons Ford, Joyce Fasula – Gerrity’s Supermarkets, Dr. Katie Leonard – Johnson College, Liz Finley – Sweda Advertising, and Michael Dennen – PNC Bank. Back Row: Marcelo DeSousa – Fastenal, J. Patrick Dietz – Peoples Security Bank & Trust, Debbie Kolsovsky – PNC Bank, Pat Rogers – Toyota of Scranton, Lisa Akulonis – Citizens Savings Bank, Bill Stevens – Sprint Print, Bryan Boles – Topp Business Solutions, and Karen Baker – Johnson College

Carpentry Auction Raises $5,781 for Children’s Advocacy Center of NEPA

Johnson College’s Carpentry Auction that was held on-campus on April 20, 2022, raised $5,781 to benefit the Children’s Advocacy Center of Northeastern Pennsylvania.

More than 80 items were auctioned off, including cutting boards, tables, cabinets, a bookcase, and more. All items were created by students in the Carpentry & Cabinetmaking Technology program. Most of the items were made from re-purposed materials.

Photo Caption: 

Johnson College’s Carpentry Auction that was held on-campus on April 20, 2022, raised $5,781 to benefit the Children’s Advocacy Center of Northeastern Pennsylvania. Pictured left to right: Kneeling: Tim Gromelski, Johnson College student, Andrea Marques, Johnson College student, and Alley Basalyga, Johnson College student. Standing: James Van Der Veer, Johnson College student, Gordon Sebring, Johnson College student, Chris Henderson, Johnson College student, Nathan McKane, Johnson College student, Marsha Pigga, Executive Director at Children’s Advocacy Center of NEPA, Tim Jackson, Johnson College student, Tyler Gries, Johnson College student, and Josh Bilinski, Johnson College student.

Johnson College and Bloomsburg University Sign Dual Admission Agreement

Johnson College and Bloomsburg University signed a dual admission transfer agreement on April 27, 2022. Through this agreement, students who apply for dual admission and graduate from Johnson College’s Electronic Engineering Technology program are guaranteed admission to Bloomsburg University. They will enter with at least full junior standing in Bloomsburg University’s Bachelor of Science in Electronics Engineering Technology program.

Johnson College students transferring to Bloomsburg University must meet minimum cumulative grade-point average requirements and satisfy all other transfer requirements. All agreements become effective in Fall 2022.

“Creating a pathway for our students to achieve a bachelor’s degree at Bloomsburg University ensures they continue to build on their Johnson College hands-on education to advance their future careers,” said Dr. Katie Leonard, President & CEO of Johnson College.

“True to our mission of educating the students of Pennsylvania and beyond, this agreement will ensure that Johnson College students have a seamless transition to Bloomsburg University, creating the best path forward to future success,”  said BU President Bashar Hanna.

About Bloomsburg University:

Established in 1839, Bloomsburg University is a comprehensive public institution that enrolls approximately 7,600 students in 57 undergraduate degree programs and 20 graduate programs, including doctorates in both the audiology and nursing practice. Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania is the fourth largest of the 14 institutions within the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE). Degrees and programs are offered through the Zeigler College of Business (AACSB-accredited), the College of Liberal Arts, the College of Education (CAEP-accredited), the College of Science and Technology, and the School of Graduate Studies. There are 374 full-time tenured/tenure track faculty, of whom 92 percent have earned terminal degrees.  On July 1, 2022, Bloomsburg will officially integrate with Lock Haven, and Mansfield Universities under the name Commonwealth University of Pennsylvania, creating a student-centered, academic powerhouse that will grow opportunities while honoring local campus traditions.

About Johnson College:

Johnson College provides real-world, hands-on learning in a supportive environment and prepares graduates to enter into or advance their careers. Johnson College degrees become essential careers. Johnson College was founded in 1912 and is the region’s only technical college, offering 17 associate degree and 4 academic certificate programs. A low student-to-instructor ratio supports an emphasis on hands-on learning. Located in Scranton on a 44-acre campus, the College is an accredited, private, non-profit, co-educational institution with a strong tradition of working with regional businesses and industries to ensure a skilled and qualified workforce. For additional information on Johnson College, please call 1-800-2-WE-WORK, email enroll@johnson.edu, or visit Johnson.edu.

PHOTO CAPTION:

Johnson College and Bloomsburg University signed a dual admission transfer agreement on April 27, 2022. Through this agreement, students who apply for dual admission and graduate from Johnson College’s Electronic Engineering Technology program are guaranteed admission to Bloomsburg University’s Bachelor of Science in Electronics Engineering Technology program. Pictured left to right: Dr. Latha Ramakrishnan, Dean, College of Science and Technology, Bloomsburg University, Dr. Diana Rogers-Adkinson, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Bloomsburg University, Dr. Kellyn Williams, Associate Vice President of Special Programs, Johnson College, and Dr. Katie Leonard, President & CEO, Johnson College.

Johnson College Hosting CNC Machining Open House at Don’s Machine Shop in West Pittston

In conjunction with Don’s Machine Shop, Johnson College is hosting a CNC Machining Open House on Thursday, May 19, 2022, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Don’s Machine Shop, located at 100 Elm Street, West Pittston. To register for this Open House, visit https://johnson.edu/cnc-machining-open-house/ or contact Johnson College’s Continuing Education Department at 570-702-8979 or continuinged@johnson.edu.

Representatives from Don’s Machine Shop and Johnson College’s Continuing Education team will detail what students will learn when they enroll in the 20-Week, 510-Hour CNC Machining Course offered at Don’s Machine Shop Mondays through Thursdays from 4 p.m. to 10:15 p.m. starting June 20, 2022. The night will also include discussions about the machining industry, connections to Johnson College’s career services team, and financial assistance for those who qualify. 

Johnson College Receives $1,000,000 Gift from Jessup Native and College Alum, Ideal T. Saldi and his wife, Frances P. Saldi

On Wednesday, April 20, 2022, during an on-campus event to celebrate Ideal T. and Frances P. Saldi Day at the College, Johnson College’s President & CEO, Dr. Katie Leonard, announced a $1,000,000 gift from Johnson College graduate Ideal T. Saldi and his wife Frances P. Saldi (formally Frances Prutisto).

The Saldi’s gift is a milestone for the College, as it’s the largest gift from an alum and one of the most significant gifts in Johnson College’s history.

“Johnson College kept me out of the coal mines and provided me the skills that allowed me to earn money to pay for college,” said Mr. Saldi. “Whatever success I have enjoyed, I owe to Johnson College.”

“Ideal and Frances’ gift will have a direct and lasting impact on our students and the College,” Dr. Leonard added. “It inspires us to deliver the best real-world, hands-on, industry-driven education that our students, industry partners, and community expect from Johnson College.”

Mr. Saldi is a graduate of Johnson College, class of 1949, Jessup High School, The Pennsylvania State University, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Mrs. Saldi is a graduate of Archbald High and earned a Liberal Arts degree from The Pennsylvania State University.

Mr. Saldi started his professional career at the General Electric Company and was employed there for 18 years, rising through the ranks to become General Manager of one of their businesses. He left General Electric to start several companies beginning with Integrated Display Systems, which he later sold to Refac Electronics in New York City and became president of the combined companies. He later became president of C-Cor Electronics in State College, Pennsylvania, and AM Communications.

In all, he started a total of 18 companies during his professional career and continues to run two he started in 1981. Mr. Saldi has served on several Board of Directors and has been awarded 18 patents during his professional career.

After raising four children, Mrs. Saldi began her career as a real estate agent – first with a retirement community, then moving on to private residential sales.

The Saldi’s have three surviving children, six grandchildren, and one great-grandchild.

Johnson College provides real-world, hands-on learning in a supportive environment and prepares graduates to enter into or advance their careers. Johnson College degrees become essential careers. Johnson College was founded in 1912 and is the region’s only technical college, offering 17 associate degree and 4 academic certificate programs. A low student-to-instructor ratio supports an emphasis on hands-on learning. Located in Scranton on a 44-acre campus, the College is an accredited, private, non-profit, co-educational institution with a strong tradition of working with regional businesses and industries to ensure a skilled and qualified workforce. For additional information on Johnson College, please call 1-800-2-WE-WORK, email enroll@johnson.edu, or visit Johnson.edu.

Photo Caption: Left to Right – Ideal T. Saldi, Johnson College Alum, class of 1949 and Dr. Katie Leonard, Johnson College’s President & CEO

Career Technology Center of Lackawanna County Students Receive Forklift Operator Certifications from Johnson College

On Sunday, April 10, 2022, Dr. Katie Leonard, President & CEO of Johnson College, congratulated students from The Career Technology Center of Lackawanna County for receiving certification for completing Johnson College Continuing Education’s Forklift Operator Training Course. 

The forklift operator training is designed to familiarize students with OSHA Powered Industrial Truck Operator Training Requirements (29CFR Standard 1910.178 and ASME B56.1), provide current training requirements under the newly adopted standards, and assist participants in becoming an authorized operators of forklifts through theory and tactile testing. Instructional topics include pre-operational inspection, picking up, traveling, placing loads, parking procedures, and practical operation.

Pictured left to right: Matthew Tucker, Dylan McGoff, Anthony Marconi, Serenity Fuller, Dr. Katie Leonard, President & CEO of Johnson College, Nicholas Lathrop, Joshua Aguero, Jordan Campbell, and Luciano Dinguis.

Now Enrolling Students in CNC Machining Training in Luzerne County

Johnson College in conjunction with Don’s Machine Shop in West Pittston continues to bring CNC Machining training to Luzerne County. Starting June 20, 2022 students will train to utilize, maintain and program Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machines inside Don’s Machine Shop’s classroom and lab at 100 Elm Street, West Pittston. Open enrollment for this 510-Hour CNC class is going on now. Space is limited. To learn more or to enroll, contact the Johnson College Continuing Education Department at 570-702-8979 or continuinged@johnson.edu.

CNC machinists manufacture precision products and components used in a variety of applications such as automotive, medical, electronics, aerospace, transportation, military, and more. Industries throughout northeastern Pennsylvania are currently in need of well-trained CNC machinist.

This 510-hour class for beginner-level students includes theory and hands-on learning experiences. The hands-on training, delivered at Don’s Machine Shop, is on some of the most state-of-the-art equipment in the region. This unique, one-of-a-kind training will help open new career opportunities right away. This relationship truly demonstrates how industry is a Johnson College student’s campus. The cost of the class is $7,500. Financial assistance may be available for those who qualify.

Since starting over 30 years ago Don’s Machine Shop, Inc. has grown to be one of the largest machine shops in Pennsylvania’s Wyoming Valley. Their 77,000 square foot climate-controlled facility contains millions of dollars’ worth of modern equipment that are continually upgraded. Don’s Machine Shop, Inc. employs 30 people and makes machine parts for companies around the globe. Many things have changed since this business started over 30 years ago, but their commitment to providing quality parts and service will never change. For more information visit http://www.donsmachine.com/.

Nose to tail: Lifestyles of the common cat

By: Amanda Melnyk, AS, CVT, ’09 

Originally published in the March 25, 2022, edition of the Valley Advantage.

https://www.thevalleyadvantage.com/community-columns/nose-to-tail-lifestyles-of-the-common-cat/article_1f325ebd-62e4-521c-954d-e8566727937a.html

This month’s column is all about the different types and lifestyles of Felis catus: our friend, the domestic cat. So, let’s jump right in.

An indoor pet cat, let’s call her Maddie, watches the outside world through her favorite window. Not only does she watch neighbors, birds, and chipmunks go about their day, but other domestic cats as well!

These unowned outdoor cats are also known as “community cats,” and this term refers to any member of the Felis catus species that roam freely throughout the community, with or without human interaction/socialization. One of these community felines, a friendly intact male stray named Viktor, will soon make his way into a permanent indoor home. The other cat commonly seen coming and going (mostly at night) is called Freddy but is not interested in any human interaction, period.

Our first question is, “What terms can we use to describe the different lifestyles of Maddie, Viktor and Feral Freddy, who are all considered domestic cats?”

• Pet: Can be strictly indoor, outdoor or both. They, like Maddie, are well socialized and familiar with people.

• Stray: Abandoned outdoor cat, like Viktor, who has had human interaction/socialization at some point in their life or are young enough to be socialized and introduced into a household.

• Feral: Wild cats, like our friend Freddy, are part of the environment. They are not socialized with humans and are not interested in living in a household among humans.

“How can we tell the difference between these cats?” is our second question.

Focusing on stray (Viktor) vs. feral (Freddy), the following tips will help differentiate between the two. Please keep in mind, all cats are individual and may not follow our human criteria!

Appearance: As a stray, Viktor’s appearance is dirty and messy. They’re not accustomed to living outside. A feral cat, like Freddy, has a clean, well-kept hair coat because they adapted to living outside.

Schedule: You may see strays in your neighborhoods during the daytime, nighttime, or all hours. A feral cat will mostly make their rounds at night, including dawn and dusk.

Sociability with humans, including responsiveness and cage behavior: A stray may approach people or living areas (porches/cars), tolerate being touched with time, respond to household sounds such as opening a food can or treat bag, and eat with humans near. These cats may have a collar and are vocal when responding to human interaction. They may hiss or growl to show anxiety, and when put into a cage/confinement. They also may come to the front of the cage, rub on it, act friendly and relax over time.

A feral cat cannot be approached or touched and will hide. These cats also will not show any familiarity with or will ignore, household sounds. They are silent around humans and will only eat once humans are gone if food is available. If put into a cage or confinement, they will get as far back as possible and may lash out with aggression. They may also climb and bang around if startled, threatened or cornered. These cats will remain tense and unsocial.

When in a stressful situation, a stray like Viktor MAY act like a feral cat, so please keep a safe distance when interacting with any community cat!

Sociability with other cats: Strays are most likely to live alone and be seen independently, while feral cats may be accustomed to living in a feral cat colony.

Lastly, here is some information to help you help our domestic cat friends who are strays or feral like Viktor or Freddy.

If you’re thinking about helping to spay/neuter strays or feral cats, a TNR (trap, neuter, and release) program may be available through local public (mobile) spay/neuter clinics.

When you see feral cats in your neighborhoods, leave them be. They are wild and have adapted to the environment. If you run across a friendly stray who was introduced to humans before becoming feral, there may be a chance for adoption.

Please consult with your local community office about “community cats” to receive specific information and ordinances.

Education is the best tool for helping all cats included in the domestic cat species! Additional resources and information are available through: www.alleycat.org.

Amanda Melnyk, AS, CVT, ’09 JC Alumni, is a full-time CVT Instructor at Johnson College’s veterinary nursing program as well as a clinical rotation instructor at the Animal Care Center on campus. She has been a part of the veterinary field for 14 years.

College to Host 5th Annual Auction for Children’s Advocacy Center of NEPA

Johnson College’s Carpentry & Cabinetmaking Technology program will host an auction to benefit the Children’s Advocacy Center of NEPA on Wednesday, April 20, 2022, on the Johnson College campus. Doors open at 5:00 p.m., and the auction starts at 6:00 p.m.

More than 60 items will be available to bid on, including cutting boards, tables, cabinets, a bookcase, and more. All items were created by students in the Carpentry & Cabinetmaking Technology program. Most of the items were made from re-purposed wood. To register to attend, please visit https://forms.gle/QoxRsLHxfveWMzkn7.

To learn more about the Children’s Advocacy Center of NEPA, visit https://cacnepa.org/.